Online Sports Betting in PA Continues to Bring in Revenue

Sports betting first became available in Pennsylvania in late 2018. Over the past couple of years, this industry has grown extremely popular here. New reports show that online sports betting in PA makes up for about 90% of all sports wagers placed.PA State Seal

This isn’t much of a surprise. Online gambling is growing more popular around the entire country. Now is the perfect time to check out how much revenue Pennsylvania’s sports betting industry is managing to bring in.

Let’s get into it!

Pennsylvania’s Gambling Revenue Continues to Fluctuate

Not long ago, Pennsylvania took a somewhat hardline stance towards the gambling industry. This is no longer the case. Today, just about all forms of gambling are available here. Revenue from this industry has fluctuated since these new gambling options became available.

In May of 2018, the Supreme Court struck down PASPA. This gave every state in the country the ability to legalize and regulate sports betting. Lawmakers in Pennsylvania immediately began taking steps to open this sports betting industry and by November of that year, it became legal.

That wasn’t the only form of gambling to recently become available here. In November of 2019, lawmakers here started allowing online poker. This form of gambling has grown extremely popular in just a few months.

Pennsylvania’s gambling industry is growing bigger every single month. It has a lot of competition, though. New York, New Jersey, and Delaware all have surging gambling industries, as well.

This week, sports betting revenue reports became available here. Let’s take a look at how much this industry is managing to bring in.

Revenue From Online Sports Betting in PA is Surging

Sports betting is growing more popular every single month. This is especially true in Pennsylvania. Last month, sports betting revenue here hit a new record.

More than $384 million was spent on sports wagers last month. These wagers were placed through the state’s eight online sports betting sites and 12 land-based betting venues. Revenue from this industry came out to $31.6 million in January.

Many believe that Super Bowl bets placed in January helped to increase revenue here. Interestingly, close to 90% of all the sports wagers placed in Pennsylvania last month were done online. FanDuel’s online sportsbook continues to be the biggest revenue earner for the state.

Land-based sports betting revenue actually dropped last month by 11.8%. This is the lowest revenue from brick and mortar sports betting venues since September. It’s clear that online sports betting in PA is beginning to take over.

Gambling competition remains very high in the northeast of the country. New York, in particular, is working hard to improve its gambling industry.

New York Continues Looking at Gambling Expansion Plans

New York is another state that’s only recently begun to embrace the gambling industry. Over the past decade, a huge number of casinos have opened in the Upstate area of New York. Unfortunately, the large number of gaming venues in this state is making it hard for the casinos here to be profitable.

To help with things, lawmakers in this state decided to legalize sports betting. Hope was that it would draw in more people to the state’s land-based casinos. That hasn’t necessarily been the case.

Things do seem to be improving, though. Each of the four casinos in Upstate New York is starting to see revenue increases. Resorts World Catskills, one of the biggest casinos in the state, saw its revenue increase by 48% last year. Lottery ticket sales are decreasing here.

State officials continue discussing the possibility of allowing sports bets to be placed online. Lawmakers in New York are beginning to see how much revenue is being earned from online sports betting in PA. Many believe that online sports wagering will become legal here within a year or two.

Pennsylvania’s sports betting industry continues to grow. Other states are beginning to take notice. We’ll need to wait and see how much revenue from this industry grows for the rest of the year.

Stay tuned for more Pennsylvania gambling news over the next few months!

Online Sports Betting in Michigan Likely Delayed Until 2021

Mobile Sports Gambling, Computer In BackgroundMichigan regulators, who are familiar with the previous implementation of new gambling regulations in Michigan, expect it to take approximately one year to solidify the rules for the industry – online poker, online casino games, sports betting, and fantasy sports.

The targeted 2021 completion of the online rules are based on the time it took to develop other rule sets in the past, said Mary Kay Bean, a spokeswoman for the Michigan Gaming Control Board.

While Detroit’s three commercial casinos, as well as the state’s 24 tribal casinos, will all need to obtain the proper mobile sports bettor operating licenses for online gambling, it’s the agency’s goal to launch on-site sports betting this spring.

“We are at a very early stage of this process,” Bean said, according to the Associated Press. “The agency must establish several sets of administrative rules, which pass through many levels of review. The timing of implementation depends not only on our agency but also on decisions other departments, agencies and the Legislature make along the way.”

The rules process could require public hearings, public comments, and regulatory impact statements. In addition, the rules must then lead to a licensing process, which will include vetting and ultimately issuing those licenses.

How Michigan Is Preparing for Legalized Sports Betting

MGM Grand Detroit has prepared for the update by opening their $6 million sports bar, Moneyline, last October. It will have betting windows and self-service kiosks once approved. But Detroit won’t be the only place it will be available.

“We view sports betting as another nice entity that will drive more people to our property,” Mike Bean, the CEO of Saginaw Chippewa Gaming Enterprises with locations in Mount Pleasant and Standish, said, according to the news wire. “Our biggest question right now is when is it all going to be ready?

Penn National Gaming Inc. is the new operator of the Greektown Casino. There have been decades-long agreements with four internet gaming operators because the organization aims to bring sports betting to its 41 locations in 19 states. Two of their locations could potentially operate in the state of Michigan.

“We’re envisioning what (sports betting) could look like if it were passed,” said Eric Schippers, Penn National senior vice president of public affairs. “Michigan is leaving a lot of money on the table it could be generating in tax revenue and benefits that could be funded from this. There’s natural pressure to strike while it’s hot. We’re hopeful Michigan won’t allow itself to get left behind.”

How Does Michigan’s Timeline Fare With Other States?

Pennsylvania, as a point of reference, took approximately two years before its first online poker site was able to launch, but that was on the long-tail of the required amount of time, almost excessively so. One year is more realistic, according to most industry analysts and experts.

The timeline largely is the standard in other states that have legalized online gaming and sports betting, said Rep. Brandt Iden, R-Oshtemo Township, who spearheaded the online gaming package. A similar package took six to eight months to implement in Indiana, he said.

“I’d like it to be a little bit quicker, but that’s probably the timeline,” Iden said.

The in-person sports betting timeline is a good step forward, he said, but it’s not likely the state will experience significant tax revenue until online gambling piece is up and running.

“Until we’re fully integrated online, I don’t think we’ll be able to capitalize on revenue. But from a consumer protection standpoint, from getting players interested, certainly getting up and going in person is helpful,” Iden said.

Expanding Casino Gaming Beyond Atlantic City Isn’t the Best Bet

Atlantic City Casino BoardwalkIt’s a new year, and one where New Jersey is reconsidering expanding its gambling footprint past Atlantic City’s shores. While the statewide referendum to expand casino gaming outside Atlantic City ended in strong defeat in 2016, the idea of it still lingers.

When the question of casino expansion was on the 2016 ballot, it was met mainly with disinterest. Around 77% of voters said “no” the referendum question that stated:

“Do you approve amending the Constitution to permit casino gambling in two additional counties in this State? At present, casino gambling is allowed only in Atlantic City in Atlantic County. Only one casino in each of the two counties would be permitted. Each casino is to be located in a town that is at least 72 miles from Atlantic City. The amendment would allow certain persons to apply first for a casino license. “

At the start of the new two-year legislative session last week, both the Assembly and Senate reintroduced resolutions that support allowing casino gaming in other areas of New Jersey.

The reintroduced resolutions vary and address permitting casino gambling in certain North Jersey counties, as well as supporting the legalization of two gambling parlors outside of Atlantic City.

That makes five resolutions in total filed in the Assembly and one in the Senate that would expand gaming, in some form or another, outside Atlantic City.

What’s Making New Jersey Reconsider?

It’s possible that lawmakers are excited about the prospect of more New Yorkers swarming to a full-scale North New Jersey casino that’s closer to the New York border. The thinking behind it is this: If New Yorkers are willing to cross the New Jersey border to place online sports bets, how much more could they attract it if there were a casino available for players?

With the success of sports betting and online gambling being at an all-time high across the country, it created speculation for a bigger push for a North New Jersey casino last year, though it never materialized.

Why It Wouldn’t Be the Best Bet for Atlantic City

Roger Gros, the publisher of Global Gaming Business Magazine, believes now’s not the time to entertain ideas about casino expansion, especially in North Jersey.

“That would be a terrible idea. It would really kind of destroy the progress Atlantic City has made over the past few years.

Any kind of increased land-based competition in New Jersey would completely reverse that positivity and start Atlantic City on a downward spiral once again.”

While Atlantic City casinos are now doing better than they have been for years, some of them continue to struggle. Bad months at the brick-and-mortar casinos can be made up by revenue from online games though, Gros said.

He pointed out that there continues to be discussions about having casinos in New York City and “that will happen eventually.” If a North Jersey casino sees any increase in profit, that may just draw action away from Atlantic City, it would likely only be at the beginning and wouldn’t be as impactful over the long term.

“We just had a referendum two years ago on this very subject: 4 out of 5 voters rejected it and now the politicians want to bring it back? That is the height of insolence,” he said. “What we should really concentrate on is really expanding the internet online and mobile sports betting.”

Tennessee Lottery Finalizing Sports Betting Regulations in February

Tennessee State Flag: Blue Circle, White Stars, Red BackgroundSix months after online sports betting became legal in Tennessee, state lottery officials are still finalizing the rules governing how licensees will operate. The Tennessee Education Lottery Corp.’s Board of Directors is scheduled to meet in Nashville on Feb. 19. That immediately follows the TEL Sports Wagering Advisory Council meeting to further discuss the draft regulations the lottery released in late November.

Dave Smith, TEL Communications Director, gave this public comment:

“The goal is the TEL Board of Directors votes on the rules and regulations at its February 19 meeting.”

It’s unsure whether lottery officially will be able to take applications after the meeting adjourn. State Rep. Rick Staples, who sponsored the bill legalizing sports betting in Tennessee, and other leaders are hopeful that they can start taking applications next month and start product rollouts beginning in March.

Tennessee to Exclusively Take Online Sports Betting Applications

In a stark contrast to how every other state that has legalized sports betting in the US has operated, Tennessee decided to go exclusively go with online sports betting applications, not requiring brick-and-mortar establishments.

The Tennessee Sports Gaming Act, passed by state legislators last spring, did not legalize physical gambling locations Currently, the state does not have any casinos. Because of this, lawmakers placed sports betting under the TEL’s discretion.

The Gaming Act enforces the following rules: Players must be at least 21 years of age and physically present in the state in order to place a bet, operators will need to pay an annual $750,000 licensing fee, and the state will impose a 20% tax on licensees’ adjusted gross income.

Sports Bettor’s Criticism Over Proposed Hold Rule

Tennessee’s innovative approach to sports betting, with the acknowledgement of how much mobile applications dominate in states that allow both retail and online establishments, has received high praise. Whereas other states, the handle for online betting far exceeds the amount brick-and-mortar sportsbooks take. In some cases, it’s as wide as an 80/20 split.

What’s not receiving critical acclaim amongst sports bettors however, is the proposed hold rate. The proposed rule would require sportsbooks to cap payouts at 85 percent. The resulting 15 percent hold is up to three times as much as the average rate for the sports wagering industry.

Robert Walker, Director of Sports Book Operations for US Bookmaking, tweeted this about the proposed hold tying into the Tennessee Lottery:

Other Concerns

Other aspects of Tennessee’s sports betting that have drawn criticism are its requirement for using official league data and its high tax rate.

Tennessee is one of only three states that requires sportsbooks to use official league data to score live betting opportunities, joining Illinois and Michigan. However, Tennessee’s law allows for an exception if the league cannot provide the data under “commercially reasonable terms.”

The state is also planning to tax licensees at 20% of their adjusted gross revenue every month. Out of all the states that generate its sports betting income off of taxes, that rate is a bit lower in comparison to Pennsylvania’s 36%.

Online Betting Passed by Tennessee’s House of Representatives

It seems that online sports betting will come to Tennessee as the House of Representatives passed a piece of legislation recently that will legalize this type of activity on the web. Tennessee could become one of the few states that gave two thumbs up to betting on sports online.

The Tennessean newspaper published a report stating that a body consisting of 99 seats approved House Bill 1. 58 voted in favor while 37 opposed the bill, with some of the opposers being pretty loud in their protest against it. According to them, legalizing online sports betting could pave the way to a big increase in gambling addiction.

The legislation regarding online sports betting was written by a Democratic Representative in Tennesse, Rick Staples. It will be sent to the Tennessee State Senate, and if they pass the bill, we could witness online sports betting in Tennessee very soon. The legislative piece was also approved by the Finance Committee, which consists of 33 members. Finally, the Governor of Tennesse, Bill Lee, will have to say his words in the end and put a signature so that everything can be set into motion.

According to Staples, Tennessee is in a unique position right now and it has huge potential to generate revenue from online sports betting. Namely, Staples argues that all the neighboring countries, including Kentucky, Alabama, Georgia, and Arkansas do not allow this type of activity, which means that many people would visit Tennessee to enjoy activities such as sports betting. Furthermore, he added that sports betting operators would use cutting-edge geo-location technology which will allow aficionados from the neighboring states to enter the so-called ‘Volunteer State’ and be able to place wagers.

According to The Tennessean, if House Bill 1 is ratified, it would allow everyone who is located in the state of Tennessee to take part in legal online betting on sports. The only boundary would be that they are of minimum gambling age which is 21 ins this southern state. Punters will have an opportunity to place wagers on both professional and collegiate sports.

On the other hand, the bill doesn’t include land-based sports betting facilities. In other words, everyone who wants to place bets will have to do that exclusively at online platforms. Furthermore, the bill suggests that $50 million in tax revenues will have to be allocated to the local government, gambling addiction programs, and education.

Furthermore, there are a couple of prohibitions that will take place if this legislative piece becomes active, and it is mainly aimed towards prohibited punters. People who are registered as athletes, referees or team owners will be strictly forbidden to partake in online sports betting as it is believed they could compromise the integrity of sports and entier leagues.

House Bill 1 was introduced as a consequence of the invalidation of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act (PASPA) in May last year. This act was largely responsible for the fact that sports betting was largely unavailable in the US for the past two decades. In fact, only Nevada offered sports betting services before PASPA was invalidated. However, some states were ready and welcomed this decision made by the United States Supreme Court. At the moment, sports betting services are available (or being actively discussed) in Delaware, New Jersey, Rhode Island, Mississippi, West Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New Mexico. Furthermore, 31 additional states are currently considering this option and its advantages and disadvantages. States such as Iowa, Washington, and Indiana are some of the states that are very likely to make the first step soon.