Cache Creek Casino and Resort Now Open After Cyberattack

Casino Text With a Roulette Wheel Dice and Chips

After September cyberattack that crippled its system and forced it to close, the Cache Creek Casino Resort near Sacramento, California reopened its doors last Monday.

Said Kari Stout-Smith, chief operating officer and general manager of the resort:

“In a year that’s been so full of ongoing challenges, I am grateful to put this temporary closure behind us,”

Indeed, the year has been full of challenger. Cache Creek was forced to close for three months ending June 8 due to the COVID-19 virus. When they were allowed to reopen, strict health and safety protocols were implemented, affecting the number of guests allowed inside the California casino. The last month, Cache Creek admitted to being a victim of a cybercrime. On Monday it opened its gates once again.

Still Work To Be Done

Last September 20, the Cache Creek casino temporarily closed it doors after what officials initially called a major systems outage. Later, it was revealed that the California casino was hit by a cyberattack on its systems and that there was possible compromise of client and employee information.

The Information Technology department of the California casino worked round the clock to restore their system and make it more secure. This week, Cache Creek finally reopened in what it termed as a “soft opening” but it says that there is still work to be done with the investigation still ongoing. Despite that, Cache Creek says that they are confident that guests can now get the four diamond experience that they have come to expect from the California casino.

Cyberattack on Casinos

Cyberattacks on casinos are not new. The Las Vegas Sands Corp. was a victim of an enormous attack by hackers with suspected links to the Iranian regime. The attack shut down servers and wiped out data drives, while stealing data, and causing an estimated $40M in damages. The breach was reportedly a retaliation for Las Vegas Sands CEO and Chairman Sheldon Adelson who made “nuking” comments on Iran.

In 2018, MGM Resorts International fell prey to a casino hack that led to the leak of the personal data of 10.6M guests on the black web. Before its sale to Virgin Hotels, the Hard Rock Las Vegas was the victim of several breaches beginning 2015. On three different occasions, hackers were able to steal card holder names, card numbers, and CVV Codes from Hard Rock customers.